Freshman Seminars 2017 Fall

SOC Title

Code

Instructor

Time

Place

CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS

87570

ALLISON, S.

W, 3-3:50 PM

SH 267

EDUCATING PUBLIC HEALTH

87571

BIC, Z

F, 9-9:50 AM

HH 100

READING THE RECORD

87572

BRODBECK, D.

W, 10-10:50 AM

MM 302

UNIVERSE

87573

CHEN, M.

Tu, 1-1:50 PM

DBH 1427

NEUROTECH

87574

DO, A.

M, 10-10:50 AM

DBH 1423

DIY ELECTRONICS

87575

HARRIS, I.

Tu, 9-9:50 AM

TBA

WANT TO BE A STAR?

87576

HILL, D.

M, 5-5:50 PM

CAC 3100B

BIAS AND PREJUDICE A

87577

JENNESS, V.

M, 1:30-2:20 PM

SE2 2372

BIAS AND PREJUDICE A is the first of a three-part, integrated series. See description below.

WOMEN IN ANTIQUITY

87578

KARANIKA,A.

M, 12-12:50 PM

HH 231

MEDITATION DREAM

87579

KUBIAK, A.

W, 11-11:50 AM

SE2 2372

ZEN MASTER?

87580

MANCHAK, J.

Tu, 2-2:50 PM

SST 238

CREATIVE LISTENING

87581

OLIVIERI, V.

Tu, 12-12:50 PM

MM 115

WORLD WAR 2

87582

RICHARDSON, G.

Tu, 3-3:50 PM

SSPB 3218

WHY PEOPLE BELIEVE

87583

SYMANSKI, R.

Tu, 3-3:50 PM

TBA

DATA, BIG DATA AND

87585

YU, Z.

M, 9-9:50 AM

SSL 152

Climate Change Solutions

Human-caused climate change threatens the environment and well-being of future generations. This seminar will address what we can do about it. After a brief introduction to the problem, we will focus on climate change solutions. What can you do personally to help avoid dangerous climate change? What are corporations, municipalities, states, and national governments doing about it? The seminar will empower students to take concrete steps toward solving a complex global challenge.

Steven Allison is an Associate Professor in the School of Biological Sciences.

Educating Instead of Medicating in Public Health

The goal of the seminar is to learn how to think healthy and increase the level of health literacy.
Students will enjoy reading and discussing health topics that address many issues in which they are interested or are involved with. This seminar will transition students from passive, memorizing -type of learning, to an active, analytical and critical learning style with practical application for personal and public health.

Zuzana Bic is a Senior Lecturer in the Program in Public Health.

Reading the Record

This course explores the interconnections between Anglophone pop and rock music, musical techniques, current events, and social identity during the tumultuous decade of the 1960s. We approach these questions primarily by means of source readings — selections from journalism, criticism, and composer interviews and autobiographies that date from the period itself—and a representative sample of several important recorded songs.

David Brodbeck is a Professor in the School of the Arts.

The Universe’s Hidden Dimensions

What is the true nature of space-time? What are the fundamental building blocks of matter?
Revolutionary landmark developments in modern physics have changed the way we answer these questions. We will take a journey through some of these remarkable ideas, including the “Standard Model of Particle Physics,” and introduce more speculative ideas, such as string theories and extra dimensions. Through this journey, we will get a glimpse of how physicists work to identify and confirm the law of nature.

Mu-Chun Chen is a Professor in the School of Physical Sciences.

Neural Technologies – A New Way to Cure Paralysis?

Neural interface technologies are systems which convert nervous system activity into the control of external devices. This essentially allows a person to directly mind control computers, robots, and other devices without the need to generate any movements. Such technologies can potentially help people with severe paralysis to control assistive or prosthetic devices to interact with their environment again.
This seminar will introduce fundamental concepts underlying how these systems operate.

An Do is an Assistant Professor in the School of Medicine.

DIY Electronics

This seminar will introduce all the basics that you will need to start making projects on your own using an Arduino microcontroller. This will be a hands on class so you will be required to spend about $80 total on parts that you will build with. We will cover very practical issues, like how to buy electrical parts, how to wire components together, and how to read a component datasheet. You do not need to know about electronics to take this seminar.

Ian Harris is an Associate Professor in the School of Information & Computer Sciences.

So, You Want To Be A Star?

Identify what success means to you and develop your critical thinking skills. Create strategies and action plans to achieve your goals and examine what stops you. Explore a research process on how to find a mentor. Learn the art of how to become unstoppable in going for what you really want in life. Develop greater self-esteem by getting in touch with your personal power and achieve a higher level of self-love and acceptance.

Donald David Hill is a Senior Lecturer in the School of the Arts.

Bias, Prejudice and Bigotry A

The focal point of this integrated freshmen seminar is bias, prejudice and bigotry in society. Led by a different faculty member each quarter, seminar participants will explore the varied sources of hostility to human and cultural diversity through interrogating the manifestations of contemporary homophobia, antisemitism, and Islamophobia. In weekly moderated conversations, students will discuss the causes and consequences of implicit bias, the interaction between personal preferences and political discourses of difference, and the use of ideologies of hate to construct communities organized around fear of the other. The purpose of this seminar series is to provide students with a conceptual vocabulary about bias, prejudice and bigotry in society while equipping them with a greater awareness of campus resources for promoting a culture of inclusive excellence for all.

This freshman seminar is the first of a three-part integrated series on bias and prejudice as seen from different disciplinary perspectives. Completion of the winter and/or spring quarter seminars (Bias and Prejudice B, C) is encouraged, but not required, to enroll in the fall quarter offering of the series.

Valerie Jenness is a Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law & Society.

Women and Gender in Greek Antiquity

This freshman seminar will investigate the socio-cultural constructions of gender in the ancient Greek world and will explore the representation of women in classical Greek literature and art. Students will be introduced to a variety of different sources, both literary and archaeological, and the methodologies and perspectives of humanistic inquiry. We will consider both the conception of female characters in epic and tragedy and the making of attitudes towards the position of women in history.

Andromache Karanika is an Associate Professor in the School of Humanities.

Mind, Meditation, Dream: Navigating the Mind

This quarter we will be investigating the mind through the medium of meditation, discussion and dream. Although we will look at the issues from an academic viewpoint, and I will discuss with you my own research and work within these areas, the focus of this particular seminar will be on learning simple meditation techniques in order to develop mental equilibrium and clarity, and to use these growing powers of clarity and calm to investigate our various mental states throughout the day and night.

Anthony James Kubiak is a Professor in the School of the Arts.

So you want to be a Zen Master?

This seminar will introduce Zen Buddhism and investigate the science, practice, and philosophy of mindfulness meditation. We will meditate together during each meeting.

John Manchak is an Associate Professor in the School of Social Sciences.

Creative Listening: Using your Ears to Think

What do you hear when you listen? Do you hear sounds, instruments, and voices, or is there something deeper with which you connect? Together, we’ll explore how we listen and how what we hear tells us a story. NO MUSIC TRAINING REQUIRED – just a desire to better use your ears!

Vincent Olivieri is a Professor in the School of the Arts.

World War 2: Biggest Battles and Worst Blunders in Military History

World War 2 was the largest military conflict in world history. In this seminar, we discuss the military history of the conflict, focusing on the principal campaigns, biggest battles, and worst blunders. We will also discuss the economic, ethical, social, and technological factors shaping military decisions and the outcomes of the battles on which we focus. The seminar is designed to appeal to military history enthusiasts and anyone else interested in the topic.

Gary Richardson is a Professor in the School of Social Sciences.

Why People Believe Weird Things

This is a one-credit freshman seminar that addresses the broad question of what kinds of weird beliefs people hold and why they hold them. We also discuss aspects of the scientific method and reasoning in general to assess the validity of beliefs in “weird things.”

Richard Symanski is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Biological Sciences.

Data, Big Data, and a BIG Problem – From Intuition to Formal Modeling and Learning

Data is everywhere. We humans use intuitions to make sense of data every day. For example,
INTUITIVELY, houses of similar sizes have similar prices. This intuition, when blended with rigorous statistical modeling, mathematical derivations, and computational algorithms, can be a powerful tool to simultaneously analyze multiple sets of massive, complexly structured, and high-dimensional data. As an illustration, I will present how to investigate the connection between brain, imaging, and genetics.

Zhaoxia Yu is an Associate Professor in the School of Information & Computer Sciences.